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July 1, 2004

You don’t have to throw your company to the lions when the time for exit approaches. Melanie Stern examines how selling to your managers or staff can provide another way out

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

You don't have to throw your company to the lions when the time for exit approaches. Melanie Stern examines how selling to your managers or staff can provide another way out

Yeah, yeah, yeah – so we know that business-owning families have never sat pretty with the idea of exiting by selling their beloved companies to a rival, and even less so with going to market.
 

July 1, 2004

Public markets are not only an attractive alternative source of finance for family or owner-managed businesses but provide a cost-effective exit strategy for the founders without losing control of the business, explains Jonathan Jenkins

Jonathan Jenkins is joint managing director of OFEX.

Public markets are not only an attractive alternative source of finance for family or owner-managed businesses but provide a cost-effective exit strategy for the founders without losing control of the business, explains Jonathan Jenkins

July 1, 2004

Most of us are familiar with the statistics illustrating family businesses’ mistrust of venture capital. Just 0.9% of UK business families turn to this sector for development finance, according to Manchester Business School, as opposed to the 72% who stick to bank loans.

Most of us are familiar with the statistics illustrating family businesses' mistrust of venture capital. Just 0.9% of UK business families turn to this sector for development finance, according to Manchester Business School, as opposed to the 72% who stick to bank loans.

May 1, 2004

The prospect of an infusion of cash can be tantalising for family firms considering a share float. But are families willing to shoulder the regulatory scrutiny that follows an IPO? Adam Knight reports

Adam Knight is a freelance financial journalist specialising in family business.

The prospect of an infusion of cash can be tantalising for family firms considering a share float. But are families willing to shoulder the regulatory scrutiny that follows an IPO? Adam Knight reports

March 1, 2004

Family businesses which pass premises down between generations could be caught in Britain’s plans to close loopholes in the inheritance tax regime, say experts familiar with the Labour government’s new budget proposals.

Family businesses which pass premises down between generations could be caught in Britain's plans to close loopholes in the inheritance tax regime, say experts familiar with the Labour government's new budget proposals.

"To date, most people's attention has been focused on the impact the government's plans will have on gifts between spouses such as a share in the marital home," said Richard Kirby, a partner at City law firm Speechly Bircham.

November 1, 2003

Business confidence: boom or bust?
If you've been reading any sort of business news recently, you're likely confused. No one seems quite sure what to make of the economy right now. It's a bit like what we constantly hear about the residential real estate market – house prices seem to be rising and falling in the same location at the same time.

September 1, 2003

By the time Families In Business readers receive this issue of the magazine, second generation family owner of Korea’s SK Global, Chey Tae Won, will be four months through a three-year jail term he received in June for serious accounting fraud.

Bad dynasties
By the time Families In Business readers receive this issue of the magazine, second generation family owner of Korea's SK Global, Chey Tae Won, will be four months through a three-year jail term he received in June for serious accounting fraud. His actions prompted a new probe by Korea's Fair Trade Commission (FTC) into the country's top six "chaebol", family-owned dynasties, including LG Group and Samsung.

June 1, 2003

Big business or big bucks is the choice presented to a family business through mergers and acquisitions, depending on how it views its future. Melanie Stern explains how the challenges faced by this sector proves that size has never mattered more in either case

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

Big business or big bucks is the choice presented to a family business through mergers and acquisitions, depending on how it views its future. Melanie Stern explains how the challenges faced by this sector proves that size has never mattered more in either case

June 1, 2003

At a time when banks are increasingly cautious about lending money, the stock market can be an attractive alternative source of capital for a family business – and, explains Georges van Erck, an IPO need not mean the family loses control of the business

Georges van Erck is Managing Director at JPMorgan, London. He has more than 30 years of investment banking experience, most of which have been spent providing corporate finance services to family-owned companies.

At a time when banks are increasingly cautious about lending money, the stock market can be an attractive alternative source of capital for a family business – and, explains Georges van Erck, an IPO need not mean the family loses control of the business

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